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Gift of Love The Rings



Authentic Rings made of
Silver, Gold and Platinum
Studded with Gems & Diamonds



Our diamond rings are authentic . Our claim is true-the diamonds, gemstones and precious metals on our site are both affordable and authentic.





Woman in Love
Elegant Necklaces
high quality diamond necklaces in classic and
modern
styles



We offer beautiful silver, gold, gemstone, pearl and diamond necklaces and pendants at outstanding prices.



Indian Tradition Redesigned




High quality
gold
and diamond
studded bangles 


Our Collection includes high quality golden bangles studded with diamonds, in classic and modern styles.



Love Bites Designer Earrings

All types of yellow, white and two-tone earrings for any occasion.

We are pleased to present diamond earrings in classic and modern styles, sterling silver earrings, gemstone earrings and studs crafted in gold and platinum:






Bond of Love
The Bracelets
designed to Perfection
studded with Diamonds

Fine Collection of elegant diamond bracelets, Sterling silver bracelets and Pearl bracelets featuring freshwater cultured pearls at outstanding prices



Love Cuffed The Cufflinks


gold, silver, gemstone, pearl and diamond cufflinks

Our Collection includes high quality gold, diamond, Pearl, Platinum, and Gemstone cufflinks, in classic and modern styles


JEWELLERY, JEWELRY - INDIAN JEWELLERY

Indian Jewellery in Goa :: by Indian Arts Exposition


Jewellery ('Jewelry' in American spelling) comprises ornamental objects worn by persons, typically made with gemstones and precious metals. Costume jewellery is made from less valuable materials. However, jewellery can and has been made out of almost every kind of material.

The word is derived from the word "jewel", which was anglicised from the Old French "jouel" in around the 13th century. Further tracing leads back to the Latin word "jocale", meaning plaything.

Some cultures have a practice of keeping large amounts of wealth stored in the form of Jewellery. Jewellery can also be symbolic, as in the case of Christians wearing a crucifix in the form of Jewellery, or, as is the case in many Western cultures, married people wearing a wedding ring.

Jewellery in various forms has been made and worn by both sexes in almost every (if not every) human culture, on every inhabited continent. Personal adornment seems to be a basic human tendency.

 
Jewellery has been part of the Indian civilization since ancient history. Ornaments made of gold, silver, copper, ivory, pottery and beads have been discovered in civilizations as ancient as the Harappa and Mohanjodaro.

 The Indus valley goldsmith knew how to make moulds for metal and terra-cotta Necklace ornaments. Gold jewellery from these civilizations consist of bracelets, necklaces, bangles, ear ornaments, rings, head ornaments, brooches, girdles etc. This art has been perfected with modern styles and further materials used. Besides gold and other metal jewellery, stones, conch shells, wood, plant seeds etc. are used. Ethnic patterns, with intricate motifs are much in demand for their absorbing styles

Jewellery has been part of the Indian civilization since ancient history. Ornaments made of gold, silver, copper, ivory, pottery and beads have been discovered in civilizations as ancient as the Harappa and Mohanjodaro.

 The Indus valley goldsmith knew how to make moulds for metal and terra-cotta Necklace ornaments. Gold jewellery from these civilizations consist of bracelets, necklaces, bangles, ear ornaments, rings, head ornaments, brooches, girdles etc. This art has been perfected with modern styles and further materials used. Besides gold and other metal Jewellery, stones, conch shells, wood, plant seeds etc. are used. Ethnic patterns, with intricate motifs are much in demand for their absorbing styles
Indian Tradition of Gifting Jewellery

Ornaments & Jewellery In India, a woman is traditionally gifted Jewellery at the time of her wedding. The Jewellery is from both her parents and her in-laws. The logic is simple. Apart from the obvious purpose of ornamentation, the Jewellery is her safeguard against the proverbial rainy day. Bereft of an income of her own, she can trade in her Jewellery as and when the need arises.
But this is not to say that the Indian woman does not like her ornaments well-crafted. Every market in India has its own share of gold and silversmiths. While gold Jewellery is pretty much a favourite with the rich and the affluent, village belles swear by silver.

 
 

Gems

Gems Many palmists and astrologers tell you precisely the clarity and carat required to ward off the evil eye or reverse a spell of ill-luck. Some of the good buys here are emeralds, sapphires, rubies, garnets, amethysts, corals and turquoise. The craft of cutting and polishing stones to achieve the most gleaming facets has been honed to perfection by the artisans of Jaipur and Calcutta.

Gold

Gold- The women of Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Goa, Kerala and Maharashtra are great sticklers for gold. This shiny metal is considered auspicious, not to mention a status symbol. Even the humblest bride down south has some gold in her trousseau.
Handcrafted gold Jewellery is still very much the norm though machine-made trinkets are fast catching on. The major difference between the Jewellery of north and south India is in the detail, delicacy and motifs. While north Indians think small is beautiful, south Indians certainly believe otherwise.

Kundan

Ornaments & Jewellery Kundan:- Delhi, Jaipur and Udaipur are famous for the age-old technique of setting gems in gold called Kundan. It is the Mughal-inspired art of setting precious stones like diamonds, emeralds and rubies in gold and silver. Gems are bedded in a surround of gold leaf rather than secured by a rim or claw.

Meenakari

Meenakari Enameling or meenakari was originally meant to protect gold, which in its pure state is so soft and malleable that it can easily wear away. However, the technique soon came to be used for all sorts of objet d’arts. Now before you ask, enameling is a champleve technique, which in simple English means that a recess is hollowed out in the surface of gold or silver to take in a mineral. For example, cobalt oxide, which gives a blue color, is then fired into the depression so as to leave a thin line separating the segments of color. The patterns are usually floral and colored in red, green and blue and can be seen on small jewellery and kumkum boxes.

Silver Jewellery

The various kinds of adornments in silver are:

Tikka or the spherical pendant for the forehead; dangling earrings called jhumkas; hansli or the choker; nath or the nose ring which may be attached with a chain to the adjacent jhumka; a girdle or taqri for the waist; a series of bracelets called kadas; payals or anklets with tiny bells on them; and finally the chakti or toe rings of the married women. Also men of Rajasthan commonly wear chokers, earrings and bracelets too.
The designs are a lovely blend of Hindu and Islamic styles, as are the karigars (craftsmen) who may be Hindu or Muslim. Silver Jewellery with ornate tribal designs is a big hit too. A relatively new addition to the repertoire is silver studded with semi-precious stones. Rajasthan, Gujarat, Himachal and Ladakh are the most happening centers of silver jewellery.

Threads, Beads & Cowries

The intricate and artistic twisting of thread is itself seen as an embellishment by the tribal communities of India. They often weave cotton thread into a broad band as a textured or patterned base, then loop through buttons, beads, metallic droplets or whatever catches their fancy. Beads, shells, cowries and feathers are simple but amazingly creative means to adorn the body beautiful. Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan, Gujarat, Himachal Pradesh and the northeastern states of Assam, Nagaland and Mizoram top the list of makers of such Jewellery.

Bangles

Bangles add grace to the feminine beauty. Indian has an ample treasure of exquisite, colorful bangles, that does not match anything. Shellac Bangles Brightly colored lac bangles are a gay and inexpensive buy in Delhi and Rajasthan. In the pink city of Jaipur, lac trinkets are a common sight in every bazaar. Check out the dazzling bangles, often studded with glass gems, spirals of base-metal wire amid a wavy striping of other colors.

The Story of Indian Jewellery

The siris blossom fastened over her ear, Whose stamens brush her cheek; The lotus-chain, like autumn moonlight soft upon her bosom meek.

Thus, described Kalidasa the Jewellery of Shakuntala. Jewellery in India has been an unbroken tradition for over 5,000 years. Such is the skill of Indian jewellers that with time, the real flowers used by Shakuntala inspired them to recreate the gifts of nature in gold and silver.

Jewellery made of natural materials

In early India, people fashioned Jewellery out of natural materials found in abundance all over the country-seeds, feathers, leaves, berries, fruits, flowers, animal bones, claws and teeth. Even today such Jewellery is used by the different tribal societies. Interestingly, these tribal jewelry items are also famous worldwide as high fashion jewelry! Excavations at Mohenjodaro and other sites of the Indus Valley civilization have unearthed a wealth of ornaments. It appears that both men and women of that time wore Jewellery made of gold, silver, copper, ivory and precious and semi-precious stones. The Ramayana and the Mahabharata are abound with descriptions of ornaments and the code of Manu defines the duties of the goldsmith. By the third century B.C., India was the leading exporter of gemstones, particularly diamonds. Gold was usually imported into the country, a practice prevalent even during the Mughal period.




Ornaments for every part of the body

In India the ornaments are made practically for every part of the body. Such a variety of ornaments bears the testimony to the excellent skills of the jewellers in India. The range of jewellery in India varied from religious one to purely aesthetic one. Jewellery was crafted not just for humans but also for the gods, ceremonial elephants and horses. The craft of Indian Jewellery was given a royal patronage right from the ancient times. The rajas and maharajas vied with each other to possess the most exquisite and the most magnificent pieces of jewellery. Temple complexes supported many different styles of jewellery-scented sandalwood bead necklaces and other beaded jewelry, the prayer bead or the rudraksh (berry of the elaocarpus canitrus) necklace, multicolored silk and gold thread necklaces.

Jewellery in India fulfils many functions and wearing it has several implications. At the most obvious level, it is a form of adornment satisfying Man's innate desire to beautify himself. However, jewellery also serves as an identity marker, as security, and as symbol of social contracts. For Hindus, jewellery is associated with most religious ceremonies, especially the samaskaras (stages of life) such as the namkarna (naming ceremony) or the vivaha (marriage). To signify marital status, Hindu women must wear the mangalsutra or the thali, which consist of gold pendants strung in a certain combination with other beads. Traditionally, a goldsmith pierces a child's ear with a gold pin twelve days after it is born.


Jewellery as investment

In the Hindu, Jain and Sikh community where women do not inherit landed property, precious metal jewellery was a major component of the streedhana (gifts given to a woman at the time of her marriage). Jewellery, because of its easy convertibility into cash, was thus regarded as security and investment.

If you are thinking of purchasing a piece of Jewellery, perhaps to celebrate a special occasion, why limit your choice to what is available to anyone?

The majority of Jewellery sold is mass-produced. Hundreds of people will probably have bought that piece before you, and as many more will buy it after you. Is that really such a "special" gift? A little extra thought and planning can mean you are able to give a piece of Jewellery which large numbers of other people can't just walk into a shop and buy. It makes your gift so much more personal, and special.

Please do not hesitate to give us a call. We are always pleased to discuss ideas and offer advice and estimates without obligation. We undertake commissions. We can work to the budget of an individual client.



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